FotoEvidence Book Award 2020 with World Press Photo

 

FotoEvidence Book Award
with World Press Photo

FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Opening: September 1, 2019
Deadline: October 15, 2019
Entry fee: $50
Prizes: publication of book, participation in exhibitions

The annual FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo recognizes a documentary photographer whose project demonstrates courage and commitment in addressing a violation of human rights, a significant injustice or an assault on human dignity.

The selected project will be published as part of a series of FotoEvidence books dedicated to long-form projects of documentary photographers working in the humanistic tradition.

The FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo winner and two selected finalists will be exhibited during the World Press Photo Exhibition in conjunction with the launch of the book in Amsterdam.

Website of Photo Contest: http://fotoevidence.com/page/book-award

FotoEvidence Book Award 2018 Winners

Standing Strong

by Josué Rivas
Winner of the 2018 FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

The gathering at Standing Rock was a dance between the modern and the ancestral. It was the epicenter of the awakening of humanity. For over seven months, I lived at the Oceti Sakowin Camp near the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota, documenting the opposition to the Dakota Access pipeline. Thousands of tribal nations and allies gathered in peaceful prayer and created a worldwide movement. They called themselves Water Protectors.

I was told by a Lakota elder at the camp that traditionally women are the guardians of Mni Wiconi (water of life) because they carry the sacred liquid when pregnant. Men are the guardians of the fire, energy that destroys and renews. With that conversation my perspective shifted and I started to understand that what was happening was something beyond opposition to another big oil extraction project. For the first time in current history, people from all four directions stood together as one and I was privileged to document it all from an indigenous perspective.

My intention for this body of work is that the next seven generations can learn from it. Indigenous peoples across the planet have been enduring displacement from their land, ceremonies, and languages for hundreds of years. Yet we all carry a collective genetic memory that tells us we are all indigenous to the Earth. Standing Rock was also a turning point in my development as a storyteller. I found that the camera was my tool and the images were my medicine.

© Josué Rivas, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Chief Arvol Looking Horse sits near the Dakota Access Pipeline during a prayer, Cannon Ball, ND, November, 2016

 

© Josué Rivas, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Doug Good Feather, a Lakota medicine man dances during a ceremony to honor the Water Protectors at Bioneers conference on October 23, 2016. San Rafael, CA

 

© Josué Rivas, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Young man putting down tobacco, Fort Yates, ND. September, 2017

 

© Josué Rivas, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Last stand at camp. Oceti Sakowin Camp, Cannon Ball, ND.  February 22, 2017

 

© Josué Rivas, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

A woman walks in the snow during a blizzard, Cannon Ball, ND, November, 2016

 

© Josué Rivas, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Pipe carrier. Oceti Sakowin Camp, Cannon Ball, ND. February 22, 2017

 

© Josué Rivas, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Man setting up a tepee. Oceti Sakowin Camp, Cannon Ball, ND November 2016

 

© Josué Rivas, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Last prayer at camp. Oceti Sakowin Camp, Cannon Ball, ND. December 2016

 

© Josué Rivas, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

A group of Water Protectors gather to pray at North Dakota’s state capital Monday, November 14, 2016.  The group was led by young indigenous activists and their allies. Bismarck, ND.

 

© Josué Rivas, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

An upside down American flag waves at a healing gathering. Fort Yates, ND, September, 2017

 

© Josué Rivas, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Thanks-taking, Oceti Sakowin Camp, Cannon Ball, ND. November 24 2016

 

© Josué Rivas, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Two men get sprayed by law enforcement with high pressure water during a demonstration near the Oceti Sakowin Camp, Cannon Ball, ND, November, 2016

 

Flint is a Place

by Zackary Canepari
Finalist of the 2018 FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

For the last 5 years I have been working in Flint, Michigan on a project titled, “Flint is a place.” The project is conceived to be an immersive dive into a city that I find more layered, nuanced and important than how it’s commonly portrayed. The Flint work is comprised of portraiture, found photos and reportage and is punctuated by the intimate conversations I’ve had over the years with the residents.

I’m interested in how ridiculous and terrible what has happened to this city is. There’s something unbelievable and surreal about a place of 100,000 people snarled in this much drama. In the 1980’s Flint had the highest median income in America. Today it is the lowest. The city has consistently been on the FBI’s top ten most violent list and has the highest ratio of abandoned homes in the country. Over 4 decades the city went from being the American dream to the American nightmare.

The work here is meant to convey what it feels like on the ground. Flint no longer needs an introduction, after the past four years and it probably hasn’t needed one for the past 30. Everyone knows what to expect when they hear the name “Flint”. Economic, political and social dysfunction. In a perfect world, this project would be conveying some other reality. But these ideas about Flint are accurate. Flint is a place of struggle. It’s true. But that’s not all it is.

The work documents a community living on the fringe. A place where the abnormal has become normal.

© Zackary Canepari, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Police lights shine on abandoned homes next a homicide scene. The shootout took place on Flint’s North side, on a particularly ominous intersection. Police sirens lit up abandoned homes on each corner. Deflated balloons from previous homicide memorials hung limply from street signs. It was a windy night and the police cones meant to mark bullet casings kept blowing down the street, detectives trying to chase them down. This was the 46th homicide in Flint in 2015.

 

© Zackary Canepari, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

People in Flint are so used to just somebody being successful and then falling off. Flint has limits. No one wants to get in the sky and see whats beyond the clouds, type of thing. I think for some people they stop caring. They don’t get out the b.s. because they kind of used to it… and they don’t see no other way of life. Two time Olympic Gold Medal Boxer Claressa “T-Rex” Shields, 20, is arguably the best female boxer in the world. But in 2015, she had to leave Flint and all her family and friends to focus on her career.

 

© Zackary Canepari, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

There are almost always old photos lying on the floors of the abandoned homes in Flint, Michigan. Flint has the highest rate of abandoned homes in the United States. The locals call them “Abandos”. They often feel like people left in a tornado. Things are tossed in all the wrong rooms. Cooking utensils are in the bedroom, clothing is in the bathtub, a mattress in the garage. Christmas decorations, clothing hangers and calendars always seem to be still hanging. Almost every house has a bible. I tend to collect things that I find in these houses. Especially photographs like the one seen here.

 

© Zackary Canepari, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

There are almost always old photos lying on the floors of the abandoned homes in Flint, Michigan. Flint has the highest rate of abandoned homes in the United States. The locals call them “Abandos”. They often feel like people left in a tornado. Things are tossed in all the wrong rooms. Cooking utensils are in the bedroom, clothing is in the bathtub, a mattress in the garage. Christmas decorations, clothing hangers and calendars always seem to be still hanging. Almost every house has a bible. I tend to collect things that I find in these houses. Especially photographs like the one seen here.

 

© Zackary Canepari, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

“We’ve got like 8 people working at any given time.  For 100K people, there is no way to be proactive.  We’re just scrapping the bottom of the barrel, just trying to keep up.  You get one call, you handle that call, you do the best you can with that call, cause there is nothing you can do about the other 50 calls that are sitting there.” Sergeant Robert Frost has been working in Flint for over 12 years and has been fired and then rehired three times do to cutbacks. Ten years ago the Flint Police Department had 300 plus officers. Today it has around 100. That’s the least number of officers for any comparable city in America.

 

© Zackary Canepari, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Officer Bridget Balasko holds a small child while her father is being searched and questioned. The suspect on the left claimed to have just lost his job and didn’t have anywhere to go so he was just hanging in his car with his daughter until the child’s mother got off of work. At one point, the child was crying and Balasko reached into the suspect’s pocket to pull out a pacifier for her.

 

© Zackary Canepari, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

The first homicide I covered in Flint. The body just lay there for hours while the officers on scene waited for detectives and medical examiners. This was the 37th murder of 2015 in Flint and came during a particularly violent stretch where there was 11 homicides in under 2 weeks. There were only 29 in all of 2014 but most of the officers and even the former Chief told me that this was an anomaly. Flint is a violent place and often the police feel that no matter what they do to get the crime numbers down, the murders won’t stop.

 

© Zackary Canepari, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Police cadets train for civil unrest at the Mott Police Academy. It is only a 4 month academy and a handful of these cadets will be joining the Flint Police Department right after graduation. The 4 officers joining Flint PD are the first new officers the PD has had in over 3 years.

 

© Zackary Canepari, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Two dogs are the victims of a drug raid on Flint’s north side. Dogs are extremely problematic during a raid. The barking and the potential of being bitten are often neutralized right away. In this raid, the suspect was found outside sitting in his car. He seemed much more broken up about the dogs than he was about going to jail. While talking to another officer he said, “I knew this day was coming and that was the only thing that I feared. I hate to have it happen to them like that though man. They didn’t deserve it”.

 

© Zackary Canepari, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

There are almost always old photos lying on the floors of the abandoned homes in Flint, Michigan. Flint has the highest rate of abandoned homes in the United States. The locals call them “Abandos”. They often feel like people left in a tornado. Things are tossed in all the wrong rooms. Cooking utensils are in the bedroom, clothing is in the bathtub, a mattress in the garage. Christmas decorations, clothing hangers and calendars always seem to be still hanging. Almost every house has a bible. I tend to collect things that I find in these houses. Especially photographs like the one seen here.

 

© Zackary Canepari, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

I’m like, “I don’t care for Obama.” Everybody gets so mad. “How can you not care for Obama? He was greatest man, the greatest president, blah, blah, blah.” And they all always bring up the fact he black, ain’t got nothing to do with me, if he ain’t did nothing for me, he’s just like the rest of them… he just like them.” Mattek, 19 years old. Politically, Flint has been voting democrat for the last 5 elections. And while the same held true in 2016, the numbers were a lot closer. A big reason was that the number of voters was down. After 8 years of Obama, the situation in Flint deteriorated leaving the residents feeling even more disenfranchised.

 

© Zackary Canepari, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

On November 8th, 2016, election day, friends and family came to pay last respects to Montel Kenyatta Wright, 46, who had been killed in a drug deal two weeks earlier. It was a bust weekend in Flint. Wright was one of three homicides over the weekend.

 

© Zackary Canepari, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Kamya, Mhy’angel and Jaziah hang at Bluebell Beach in Flint, Michigan. Bluebell is a popular summertime spot in Flint but it is also known as a place with high levels of crime and violence. The county has been working hard to improve the conditions and make it more family friendly.

 

© Zackary Canepari, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Kamya, Mhy’angel and Jaziah hang at Bluebell Beach in Flint, Michigan. Bluebell is a popular summertime spot in Flint but it is also known as a place with high levels of crime and violence. The county has been working hard to improve the conditions and make it more family friendly.

 

A Light Inside

by Danille Villasana
Finalist of the 2018 FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Tamara, the first trans woman I met in Lima, Peru, often told me she wasn’t going to live past 30. How could she, she’d ask, when society treats her as less than human? Like a self-fulfilling prophecy, Tamara’s death this year came shortly after her 30th birthday.

Through years of documenting the hardships trans women face, I’ve realized that an early death is more common than a long life. In fact, most trans women in Latin America die or are murdered before they reach 35 and the region leads the world in homicides of transgender people. Latin America’s chauvinistic, conservative culture discriminates against trans women, seriously threatening their health, security, life expectancy, and employment prospects. With few options or economic support, the majority fall into prostitution where they are susceptible to disease, violence, and abuse.

Traditional media, focusing on sensationalistic aspects of their lives, contributes to a narrow perspective that further stigmatizes trans women. In addition to documenting injustice, I’ve aimed my camera on their daily lives to show that they seek happiness, fulfillment, and love just like everyone.

© Danille Villasana, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Like many other countries worldwide, there is a stereotype in Peru that trans women are only capable of working as hairdressers or sex workers. Because of high competition for salon work and the need to pay for studies, many trans women are relegated to prostitution. Here Camila, left, gets out of a taxi after a long night of dancing.

 

© Danille Villasana, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Danuska, left, and Oriana, right, talk with a young girl and her mother, not pictured, on the street while experiencing down time during work.

 

© Danille Villasana, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

After resisting sexual relations with a client without a condom, Tamara was injured with a broken glass that he threw at her face. “You have to be careful with clients because they’re not clients, they are bad men that can cheat you, that can take you somewhere. They treat you bad, they beat you, and they rob you. I have suffered through that a few times,” said Tamara in an interview.

 

© Danille Villasana, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Along with other members of Peru’s only transgender cumbia dance group, Briss, center, waits backstage before performing at a local LGBTQIA night club. Though Briss says it’s hard to live as a trans person in Peruvian society because of the psychological abuse, she said dancing for the Tranxgresoras strengthens them and helps them to push forward.

 

© Danille Villasana, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Briss, left, looks at her computer with her friend Erika, who has since passed away.

 

© Danille Villasana, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Tamara, who always keeps a collection of saints in the corner of her room with a lit candle, often talks about how she will not live past 30.

 

© Danille Villasana, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Trans women are extremely marginalized and discriminated against in Peruvian society. Persecution begins early, causing them to abandon their studies and families. With few options or support, many practice prostitution. As sex workers with no legal protections, they’re at greater risk of violence and sexual and substance abuse, and are less able to protect their health. Here, a trans woman stands inside a room of a home where many rent rooms.

 

© Danille Villasana, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Police put a trans woman into their vehicle during a nightly patrol in downtown Lima.

 

© Danille Villasana, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Asumi, a transgender sex worker, stands in the light of a police car during a nightly patrol along the streets of downtown Lima.

 

© Danille Villasana, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Katalina sits in Tamara’s room after talking to her mom on the phone. She cried off and on that afternoon, saying that she missed her.

 

© Danille Villasana, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Remnants of enduring a long, hard life, Piojo’s emaciated arms are covered from wrist to elbow in deep, razorblade-thin scars. Piojo passed away on March 29, 2015, due to complications with Tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS.

 

© Danille Villasana, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo

Evila, Tamara’s mother, walks with friends who carry Tamara’s coffin towards her burial place in Lima. Tamara’s death at a young age is tragically common, as most trans women in Latin America die or are murdered before they reach 35. Latin America leads the world in homicides of transgender people (80% of global trans homicides occur in the region) and HIV prevalence among trans women is nearly 50 times higher than in the general population.

 

Next:
PHmuseum Women Photographers Grant
PHmuseum Women Photographers Grant

 

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